Barry Fitzgerald as Mr. Pest Man

Has been operating Mr. Pest Man on the Sunshine Coast,
Queensland Australia for 19 years, servicing from
Caboolture to Gympie in all areas of Pest Control.

Spiders

 
Redback Spider

The toxic Redback can be identified by its orange or red stripe running across it’s back. The female has caused death and injury through it’s bite and is considered to be very venomous. The spider is found in all regions of Australia. The spider likes to hide in stacked articles and rubbish during the day. Males occur around females around late summer and autumn.

First Aid
Apply an ice pack to the bitten area to relieve pain. Do not apply a pressure bandage (venom movement is slow and pressure worsens pain). Collect the spider for positive identification. Seek medical attention.
© Copyright Australian Museum Online

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Funnel-Web Spider

Funnel-webs are large spiders (1.5 – 4.5 cm body length) with glossy dark brown to black carapace. The abdomen is usually dark plum to black and not patterned.

Males often have a ventral spur or swelling midway along the second leg, which is pointed in Atrax and blunt (when present) in Hadronyche. Spinnerets usually obvious, finger-like and at the end of the abdomen. The eyes of Funnel-webs are closely grouped.

First Aid
People are usually bitten on a limb. Immediate action should be taken to apply a pressure immobilisation bandage and immobilise the bitten limb using a splint. Restrict the victim’s movement.

Capture the spider for positive identification. Do not wash venom off the skin, as retained venom will assist identification. Seek medical attention urgently.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image ref: www.austmus.gov.au
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Wolf Spider

There are many species of Wolf spider, ranging in size from about 1-8 cm across the legs. Their body colours are typically drab, with most having variegated patterns in brown and yellow, grey, black and white; some inland species are a bright salmon pink below. Often the patterns include radiating lines on the carapace (front of the body) and scroll-like patterns on the abdomen.

The spider’s underside is light grey, cream or black, sometimes salmon pink, often with black or white markings superimposed. The sides of their jaws may have a small raised orange spot or ‘boss’. Wolf spiders have eight eyes in three rows (4,2,2), with the four smaller eyes in front and the four largest arranged in a square on top of the high and convex head.

Symptoms of a Wolf spider bite are usually minor, restricted to local pain or itchiness. Less commonly, symptoms can include swelling, prolonged pain, dizziness, rapid pulse and nausea.

First aid
Seek medical attention if symptoms persist.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image Ref: www.escapismphotography.com

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Black House Spider

Black and Grey House Spiders are widely distributed in southern and eastern Australia. Their webs form untidy, lacy silk sheets with funnel-like entrances. Black House Spiders are found on tree trunks, logs, rock walls and buildings (in window frames, wall crevices, etc). Badumna longinquus may be found in similar locations and often builds webs on foliage.

Bite

Black House Spiders are timid animals and bites from them are infrequent. The bite may be quite painful and cause local swelling. Symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, sweating and giddiness are occasionally recorded. In a few cases skin lesions (Necrotising Arachnidism) have developed after multiple bites.

First Aid
A cold pack may relieve local pain. Seek medical attention if symptoms persist.
© Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image Ref: www.wch.sa.gov.au

Control
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ST. Andrews Cross Spider

The St Andrew’s Cross Spider has a body length of 1 – 1.5 cm (female) or 5 cm (male). Like many of the Banded Orb Weavers it can be identified by the bands across the abdomen. The bands are yellow, white and black, with some red as well.

Toxicity
Orb weavers are reluctant to bite. Symptoms are usually negligible or mild local pain, numbness and swelling. Occasionally nausea and dizziness can occur after a bite. Humped Orb Weavers have very small fangs and they are timid and reluctant to bite.

First aid
Seek medical attention if symptoms persist.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image ref: www.austmus.gov.au

Control
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Garden Orb Web Spider

The commonly seen Garden Orb Weavers are 2 – 3 cm (female) or 1.5 – 2 cm (male) in body length. Most are stout, reddish-brown or grey spiders with a leaf-shaped pattern on their fat, roughly triangular abdomens, which also have two noticeable humps towards the front. They sometimes have a dorsal stripe which may be white or brown edged with white.

Toxicity
Orb weavers are reluctant to bite. Symptoms are usually negligible or mild local pain, numbness and swelling. Occasionally nausea and dizziness can occur after a bite. Humped Orb Weavers have very small fangs and they are timid and reluctant to bite.

First aid
Seek medical attention if symptoms persist.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image Ref: www.wch.sa.gov.au

Control
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Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spiders are found living under loose bark on trees, in crevices on rock walls and in logs, under rocks and slabs of bark on the ground, and on foliage. Dozens of the social huntsman species, Delena cancerides, can be seen sitting together under bark on dead trees and stumps (notably wattles) but they can also be found on the ground under rocks and bark slabs. Badge Huntsman Spiders are often found on foliage but some woodland species are burrow builders, with and without trapdoors. Huntsman spiders of many species sometimes enter houses. They are also notorious for entering cars, and being found hiding behind sun visors or running across the dashboard.

Bite
Huntsman spider bites usually result only in transient local pain and swelling. However, some Badge Huntsman spider bites have caused prolonged pain, inflammation, headache, vomiting and irregular pulse rate.

First aid
A cold pack may relieve local pain. Seek medical attention if symptoms. persist.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image Ref: www.wch.sa.gov.au

Control
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Mouse Spider

These spiders are squat animals 1-3cm long (Missulena bradleyi: 2 cm (female), 1.5cm (male); Missulena occatoria 2.5cm (female), 1.5cm (male)). They have a glossy carapace and their head area is high and broad with very large, bulbous jaws. Mouse spiders’ eyes are widespread across the front of their head. The spinnerets, at the back of the abdomen, are short and blunt. Females are black overall and are larger than the males, especially in the Red-headed Mouse Spider.

Toxicity
Mouse Spider venom may be very toxic, but only one serious envenomation has been recorded. Other bites have occurred causing minor effects. Funnel-web spider antivenom has proved effective in the one confirmed case.

First Aid
Until more toxicity data is available it is prudent to treat as for Funnel-web spider bite, especially if the victim is a child. Apply a pressure bandage over the bitten area as high up the limb as possible. Immobilise the victim. Collect spider for positive identification. Do not wash venom off the skin, as retained venom will assist identification.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image Ref: www.wch.sa.gov.au

Control
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Bush-Footed Trap-Door Spider

Trapdoor spiders are 1.5-3 cm in body length. They have short, blunt spinnerets. Males usually have a small double spur halfway along their first leg. Females are larger than males, and tend to be harder to identify to species level. These spiders tend to be quite timid, although the male may rear up if threatened.

Toxicity
Brown Trapdoor Spiders are often mistaken for Funnel-web spiders but their bites are not dangerous. Local pain and swelling may occur. Sigillate Trapdoor Spider bites may also cause local pain and swelling. There is one report of unspecified ‘severe effects’ from a Sigillate Trapdoor Spider bite.

First aid
Seek medical attention if symptoms persist. Collect spider for a positive identification.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image Ref: mamba.bio.uci.edu

Control
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The White Tailed Spider

The white tailed spider has been found in Australia for many years. The spider is easily identified by its elongated shape (1-2.5cm body length), cylindrical lemon pip shaped abdomen and is velvety black with dirty white markings at the top of the abdomen and on the tip of the tail. The legs are glossy with a dark reddish tint. Male spiders have striped legs.
Their nomadic nature leads them into homes where they are most commonly found during spring to late autumn. White tailed spiders aren’t web bound and catch their prey by predation. Being hunters, they are swift moving and scurry away when disturbed.

©
Copyright Australian Museum Online
Image Ref: www.wch.sa.gov.au

Control
: PEST CONTROL OPTIONS
For advice on how to minimise the risk of Spiders in your home, ask Mr.Pestman to visit your premisis. Click here to email Mr.Pestman now.

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